Navigate / search

Image of the Future Episode Five: Where Art Meets Democracy

On February 15th, Pomegranate Center hosted our first ever live-taped episode of the Image of the Future podcast. We took our experiment in democratic dialogue out of the studio and onto the stage in front of a live audience. To mark the special occasion, we invited two guests to join host Milenko Matanovic: Valerie Curtis-Newton is a professor in Acting and Directing and Head of Performance at the University of Washington and oversees the Hansberry Project, a professional African American theatre lab. Ben Phillips is a senior program manager for Citizen University. 

Milenko interviewed Valerie and Ben about what lies at the intersection of art and democracy, the tension that exists in public art projects, and what makes them hopeful about the future.

 

Project Update: Hawthorne Elementary

Here at Pomegranate, we’ve long believed that a school playground is more than a place for kids to run around at recess. It’s a community gathering place where kids connect with the outdoors through open-ended learning. We also know that the process of designing and building a playground is more than a construction project. It’s an opportunity to bring a school’s community together and create a rich platform for student learning and legacy.

Read more

Image of the Future Episode Four: Not What we Have, but who we are

This episode features an interview with Ron Sher, the founder of Third Place Books and founder and CEO of Sher Partners, a family real estate development, management, and investment firm. Ron has long been active in the community with special emphasis on the role of urbanism and preservation of the environment.

 

Image of the Future Episode Three: Place is Inevitable

The Institute for Everyday Democracy is a place to exchange ideas, join in discussions, and generate a body of thought about how we participate in our democracy. Through our Image of the Future podcast, we host conversations that collectively explore ideas that prepare us for the future. Such a collective exercise is not about what we like or don’t like, nor is it about the “me” or “mine.” It is a much deeper and courageous exploration of what ought to happen.

Read more